Safety First: Oil Catch Tank Safety Fundatmentals

Safety First: Oil Catch Tank Safety Fundatmentals

OCT100 Oil Catch Tank Update: As with ALL products we release, static stress analysis is now complete for the OCT100: We've created conditions and safety criteria which far exceed what would be possible to re-create on the street or even a race track. In fact, in order to generate the 1000N (100kg) of vertical/horizontal load (FOS/Assurance Coefficient: 4.01) we've applied you would need a achieve an acceleration equal to 20Gs

Knowledge Drop: So what's the purpose of all this? It seems every company, ebay shop now offer an Oil Catch Tank/Oil Air Separator option within their product range.  Some companies make nothing but catch tanks. Some are made from billet with the vast majority fabricated from 1.5mm to 2.5mm aluminium sheet metal. Of those made from billet, 99% have sheet metal laser cut brackets; this is important as it is the bracket which takes the "brunt" of the force. To dive down even further, of those that are made from billet & are vented (i.e feature a breather filter);

  1. NONE actually have roll-over protection (ours have this safety feature by default) to stop oil from spilling out of the breather in the event of a crash and/or rollover; and
  2. we can't find any published data related to static or dynamic stress results (there are numerous info-graphics which illustrate the oil/air separation function only).

The auto-ignition temperature or flamable limits of engine oil is measured at approximately 365 °C / 689 F at atmospheric pressure and much lower in a pressurised environment.  There are countless examples both on the street and track of engine fires due to oil spillage onto a hot exhaust manifold and many reported instances where the source was identified as originating from a poorly engineered oil catch. Manifolds and/or exhaust pipes on some vehicles can reach up to  648 C /1200 degrees F and the instance oil comes into contact with a scorching hot manifold...well its GAME OVER.

Ask yourself this question: is it worth saving a few $$$ for a product which may look great but is actually a potential fire hazard?

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